Safe Travel with your Husky

by Kevin Stard | Last Updated: 19.01.2021

This page looks at ways to keep your dogs happy while travelling in a van or a car. Travel can be stressful for dogs, and although Huskies and sled dogs are generally good travelers, they may be nervous initially, or get travel sick.

In order to make your journeys with your puppy or dog as safe and comfortable as possible you should:

MAKE SURE YOUR DOG IS SECURE

It is important that your Husky is secure within the vehicle. If they are not, they might well try and climb all over you or out of the window etc. This is obviously a dangerous situation, and may put your dog in danger or cause you to become distracted while driving.

You should make sure your Husky is either in a crate, or at least behind a dog guard. Car Crates are more suitable for some cars than standard crates. Dog Guards are a good option, but be aware that, unlike crates, they do not contain the dog when the boot is open.

KEEP CALM

Driving can be stressful at the best of times, and if a Husky is being noisy or or acting up, we can all become stressed. Huskies will pick up on stress and react to it, which exacerbates the situation. Obviously, if your Husky is distressed or needs attention, find the nearest safe place to stop. Until it is possible to do so, keep as calm as you can.

BE PREPARED

It is very important to have some idea of how you would deal with a road emergency if you are travelling with Huskies or any other animals.

Transporting Dogs

You must make sure that your Husky is secure inside your vehicle, preferably in a crate or secured behind a dog guard. Seat-belts are available for dogs, although we’ve never used them so can’t recommend them personally. One concern we would have is that a sled dog might well chew through any fabric restraints.

Keeping your Husky secure in this way is not ony safer for the dog, but for you and other road users. A dog that is free to jump around the car may cause you to be distracted and a danger to yourself and others. We have also heard of unrestrained Huskies suddenly jumping out of open car windows when stopped at traffic lights – keeping your Husky safely contained should avert the risk of this happening.

Do remember before you set out with your Husky, that it may well get wet and muddy in which case you will want to carry a couple of old towels with you in your vehicle.

If you have an older dog, you want to think about getting a portable Folding Pet Ramp to keep in your vehicle to help your dog to get in and out rather than having to jump up.

Preparing For Emergencies

Whenever we are out in a vehicle with our Huskies, we always make sure to have a tie out pin and chains that can safely hold all the dogs we have with us. We make sure of this in case we are in a road accident.

If you are travelling with a Husky, it is important to prepare for situations where you may need to evacuate them quickly from your car or van. A crash on the motorway may seem unlikely, but if it happens the key priorities are obviously to make sure any passengers and dogs are safe, which may mean moving them away from the vehicle.

Even in the event of a breakdown, you may need to take your dogs out of your car or van, and having some way to keep them safe and secure is invaluable in such a situation. We ensure to have metal chains with us, as in an emergency situation the dogs may be stressed and attempt to chew though fabric leads or ropes.

We would highly recommend that all owners carry a first aid kit in their car. More information on first aid kits can be found on our page on First Aid.

Travel Sickness

Huskies and sled dogs, especially puppies, often get travel sick until they get used to car journeys. In fact, every puppy we’ve ever had has spent the journey back to our home drooling and throwing up all over us! Don’t be too alarmed by this happening – it’s pretty standard.

Do prepare for your dog or puppy to get sick. When you pick up your new Husky puppy or dog, take along lots of kitchen towel, plastic bags, wet-wipes and a couple of old bath towels or blankets. Ask the breeder or previous owner not to feed your Husky puppy or dog for a couple of hours before you pick it up. It will probably be sick anyway, but maybe a bit less-so than otherwise!